U.S. ARMY RESERVE

Earn great benefits while serving part-time.

EXPAND YOUR SKILLS AND YOUR FUTURE

Advance your career and your life in the Army Reserve. Learn valuable skills and serve close to home while continuing your civilian career or education.

FIND A REWARDING PART-TIME CAREER IN THE ARMY RESERVE

The Army Judge Advocate General’s Corps (JAG Corps) is a different kind of law firm. Since its founding in 1775, the JAG Corps has retained its original mission to represent the legal interests of Soldiers and the U.S. Army with unmatched strength and courage, character and commitment, and unsurpassed knowledge of the law.

Serving in the Army Reserve in the JAG Corps is a perfect option for those who wish to maintain their civilian employment and serve their country. Over 1,800 Judge Advocates serve part-time in the Army Reserve.

DIVERSITY OF PRACTICE

Army Reserve Judge Advocates practice in diverse areas. They may prosecute, defend or judge courts-martial, negotiate and review government contracts, act as counsel at administrative hearings, or provide legal advice in such specialized areas as international, labor, regulatory, patent or tax, family law and estate planning, all while maintaining their civilian careers. Army Reserve Judge Advocates train and prepare for missions in the same manner as their Active Duty counterparts.

POSITIVE WORK ENVIRONMENT

Leadership, physical fitness, diversity, and collegiality are priorities in the JAG Corps. Although new Judge Advocates have autonomy in the execution of their work, every Army legal office operates as a team, and no one is ever on their own. New Judge Advocates receive assistance from their peers and have multiple levels of mentorship and supervision. Supervisors are deeply invested in the development and growth of Judge Advocates as both officers and attorneys. The JAG Corps relies on the contributions of those with differing opinions and perspectives, valuing the diverse backgrounds and experiences of all Judge Advocates.

WAYS TO SERVE

TROOP PROGRAM UNIT

Army Reserve Judge Advocates are initially assigned to a Troop Program Unit (TPU) located near their home. A typical year in a TPU includes training one weekend a month and 15 days of continuous annual training. Army Reserve Judge Advocates earn pay and accumulate points toward Army Reserve retirement benefits.

INDIVIDUAL MOBILIZATION AUGMENTEE PROGRAM

Individual Mobilization Augmentee (IMA) Judge Advocates are assigned to an Active Army unit and complete 12 days of annual training each year, while earning pay and retirement points. IMA Judge Advocates earn additional retirement points by completing Army correspondence courses or individually assigned legal tasks throughout the year.

MOBILIZATION AND DEPLOYMENT

Army Reserve Judge Advocates have opportunities to serve on Active Duty for certain periods throughout their career. Army Reserve Judge Advocates mobilize and deploy in support of Army legal operations both in the U.S. and abroad.

BENEFITS

Becoming a Judge Advocate is personally, professionally, and financially rewarding. In addition to your salary, the JAG Corps offers student loan repayment and other benefits that will enable you build your future. You will receive both tangible and intangible benefits not offered by other employers.

LOCATIONS

Army Reserve Judge Advocates serve at most major Army installations and additional locations throughout the United States and overseas.
New Army Reserve Judge Advocates are generally assigned to the unit located closest to their residence.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

MAJ A. Benjamin Spencer, USAR JA and Dean, William and Mary Law School MAJ A. Benjamin Spencer, USAR JA and Dean, William and Mary Law School
MAJ A. Benjamin Spencer, USAR JA and Dean, William and Mary Law School

All Army Reserve applicants must meet the following criteria at the time of entry into the JAG Corps.
Law students may apply as early as their final fall semester of law school.

  • Be of good moral standing and character
  • Be physically and mentally fit
  • Demonstrate leadership potential and a record of proven scholastic ability
  • Meet security clearance requirements
  • Be a U.S. citizen (dual citizenship may be allowed depending on the country). Applicants who will attain citizenship within one year of the application date are eligible to apply.
  • At the time of entry onto active duty, hold a JD from an ABA-accredited law school. The law school’s ABA accreditation requirement may be waived where applicants have earned an LL.M from an ABA-accredited law school.
  • At the time of entry onto active duty, be admitted to the bar of the highest court of any State, Commonwealth, or Territory of the United States, or the District of Columbia
  • Be under the age of 33 at the time of entry into the JAG Corps (years of prior commissioned military service will increase the age limit). Waivers for those exceeding the age limit are considered in meritorious cases.